AFO Blog

Get the latest news, announcements, and research highlights from our AFO members.  Below, are the most recent member blog posts.  For a full list of posts, click here.

Recent Posts:

Researchers Develop an Effective Tool for Reducing Mammalian Predation at Nests of Critically Endangered Florida Grasshopper Sparrows

Researchers develop an effective tool for reducing mammalian predation at nests of critically endangered Florida Grasshopper Sparrows   Predation is a common cause of nest failure for many birds, but sometimes predation rates can be high enough to warrant action by managers tasked with protecting imperiled species. Discovering new ways to prevent or decrease predation may be a critical step towards recovering endangered populations. New research just published in The Journal of Field Ornithology reveals…


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Gambling at a high-elevations: the risks of enlarged eggs for Mountain Bluebirds

Gambling at a high-elevations: the risks of enlarged eggs for Mountain Bluebirds Most studies that have looked at why female birds lay the number of eggs they do, and no more, have focused on the consequences of having too many mouths to feed. Few studies have focused on potential problems with having too many eggs to heat. One rarely tested hypothesis suggests that females lay as many eggs as they can effectively incubate. If they…


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2018 meeting recap

2018 meeting recap Between the 7th and 9th June, 2018 AFO held its annual meeting jointly with the Wilson Ornithological Society at the Chattanooga Convention Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The meeting offered nearly 100 oral and poster presentations. Highlights from the program included the 2018 Margaret Morse Nice lecture given by Dr. Reed Bowman (Archbold Biological Station) entitled “The challenges of long-term research: getting the work done and keeping it relevant”, and the AFO plenary…


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Member notes from the field: David Millican

Member notes from the field: David Millican   Entry 1 It’s early October, “springtime” in Namibia. This is not the cool Blacksburg spring to which I’m accustomed. This “springtime” is dry, dehydrating, and desiccating; the discovery of true damnation. The moisture evaporates off my tongue as if it were splashed on a frying pan, the last bit of medicine from your Nalgene. The thrush does not sit outside my window and call, for it too…


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Notes on the breeding biology of Rufous Potoos in lowland Ecuadorian Amazon

Notes on the breeding biology of Rufous Potoos in lowland Ecuadorian Amazon Potoos are some of the most intriguing birds of the Neotropics. Strictly nocturnal and very hard to see, they hunt insects from a perch, with a technique similar to the used by flycatchers. During the day they perch upright on tree stumps, camouflaging so good that they look like part of the stump or like a dead leaf. There are seven species of…


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