Gambling at a high-elevations: the risks of enlarged eggs for Mountain Bluebirds

Gambling at a high-elevations: the risks of enlarged eggs for Mountain Bluebirds

Gambling at a high-elevations: the risks of enlarged eggs for Mountain Bluebirds Most studies that have looked at why female birds lay the number of eggs they do, and no more, have focused on the consequences of having too many mouths to feed. Few studies have focused on potential problems with having too many eggs to heat. One rarely tested hypothesis suggests that females lay as many eggs as they can effectively incubate. If they laid more eggs, then some or perhaps all eggs would fail to hatch.

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Member notes from the field: David Millican

Member notes from the field: David Millican

Member notes from the field: David Millican   Entry 1 It’s early October, “springtime” in Namibia. This is not the cool Blacksburg spring to which I’m accustomed. This “springtime” is dry, dehydrating, and desiccating; the discovery of true damnation. The moisture evaporates off my tongue as if it were splashed on a frying pan, the last bit of medicine from your Nalgene. The thrush does not sit outside my window and call, for it too sees the futility in displaying in this heat. Nor does the sweet smell of flowers fill the air. A few sporadic trees are budding, leaving purple, yellow, and white carpets beneath their canopies; but most are waiting for the rains, which are still a couple

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The effect of whisper calls on the settlement decisions in female Veeries

The effect of whisper calls on the settlement decisions in female Veeries

One of this year’s Student Presentation Awards goes to William Fetzner, who recently graduated from Texas Tech University with an M.S. in Biology. William presented his research in an oral presentation in a Vocalization & Communication session of the joint AFO-WOS meeting in Chattanooga, TN, USA. Below is a contributed post from William on his research:

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Implications for using singed feathers in determining geographic origin with wildlife forensics approaches

Implications for using singed feathers in determining geographic origin with wildlife forensics approaches

One of this year’s Student Presentation Awards goes to Abigail Reid, a high school student in the Science Research Program at Pawling High School, NY. Abigail presented her research as an oral presentation in a Methodology & Techniques session of the joint AFO-WOS meeting in Chattanooga, TN, USA. Below is a contributed post from Abigail on her research:

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Response of gut microbiota to the energetic demands of long-distance passerine migration

Response of gut microbiota to the energetic demands of long-distance passerine migration

One of 2013’s Bergstrom Award recipients was William Lewis, a Master’s student at the University of Southern Mississippi. Below is a contributed post from William on his research:   My name is William Lewis and a few years ago the Association of Field Ornithologists awarded me the E. Alexander Bergstrom Memorial Research Award to help finance my research examining the gut microbiota of migratory passerines stopping along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico.  I obtained my Master’s degree from the University of Southern Mississippi in December 2015 and wanted to report on the major findings of my research. The gastrointestinal tracts of vertebrates host a very large and diverse community of microorganisms (the gut microbiota) which has been

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